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What is a Physician or a Surgeon?

So, you are thinking about a career as a physician or a surgeon.

Well, that’s awesome!

The question is, do you have what it takes?

Keep reading to find out more…

If you are interested in becoming a physician or a surgeon, you are in good company. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the workforce is made up of 713,800 physicians and surgeons in the United States.

So, is there any room left for you?

Great question!

And the answer is yes.

Employment of physicians and surgeons is projected to grow by 13 percent from 2016 to 2026, which is faster than the average for all occupations. Growth will occur for a number of reasons.

The growing and aging population is expected to drive overall growth in the demand for physician services. As the older population grows and rates of chronic illnesses increase, consumers will seek high levels of care that use the latest technologies, diagnostic tests, and therapies.

Job prospects are expected to be very good because almost all graduates of domestic medical schools are matched to residencies (their first jobs as physicians) immediately after graduating.

Prospects should be especially good for physicians who are willing to practice in rural and low-income areas because these areas tend to have difficulty attracting physicians. Job prospects also should be good for physicians in specialties dealing with health issues that mainly affect aging baby boomers. For example, physicians specializing in cardiology and radiology will be needed because the risks for heart disease and cancer increase as people age.

Who is becoming a physician or a surgeon?

According to datausa.io, the physician and surgeon workforce is 63.2% male.

What personal qualities and characteristics make a good physician or surgeon?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the following qualities are important to have as a physician or a surgeon.

Communication skills. Physicians and surgeons need to be excellent communicators. They must communicate effectively with their patients and other healthcare support staff.

Compassion. Patients who are sick or injured may be in extreme pain or distress. Physicians and surgeons must treat patients and their families with compassion and understanding.

Detail oriented. Patients must receive appropriate treatment and medications. Physicians and surgeons must accurately monitor and record various pieces of information related to patient care.

Dexterity. Physicians and surgeons may work with very precise and sometimes sharp tools, and mistakes can have serious consequences.

Leadership skills. Physicians who work in their own practice must manage a staff of other professionals.

Organizational skills. Good recordkeeping and other organizational skills are critical in both medical and business settings.

Patience. Physicians and surgeons may work for long periods with patients who need special attention. Persons who fear medical treatment may require more patience.

Physical stamina. Physicians and surgeons should be comfortable lifting or turning disabled patients or performing other physical tasks. Surgeons may spend a great deal of time bending over patients during surgery.

Problem-solving skills. Physicians and surgeons need to evaluate patients’ symptoms and administer the appropriate treatments. They need to do this quickly if a patient’s life is threatened.

The bottom line: If becoming a physician or a surgeon is something you feel passionately about, the one word of advice we will give you is: Go for it!